Accessibility Skip to main content

Voting in the UK parliamentary election

There are three ways to vote in the UK parliamentary election on 7 May 2015.

  • In person, at our polling places from 7am to 10pm on Thursday 7 May 2015. Your polling place will be detailed on your poll card (which you will receive through the post). You can find your polling place using our property search.
  • By post – as long as you have registered for a postal vote. Your vote must be received by 10pm on Thursday 7 May 2015 or it won’t be counted – if you leave it too late to post your vote back to us, you can hand it in to any polling place in South Ayrshire before they close at 10pm on polling day.
  • By proxy – where you trust someone else to cast your vote on your behalf. You must be registered for a proxy vote to do this. You can download proxy vote registration forms from the Electoral Registration Office website or at www.aboutmyvote.co.uk .

Your ballot paper will list the name and address of each candidate standing for election. Their party name and logo will also be included, where appropriate. If they are not standing for a party, it will say “independent”.

To vote, you must put one cross (X) next to the one candidate that you wish to vote for.

Make sure you cast your vote how you want

The Electoral Commission has produced some guidelines to help you protect your right to vote.

Friends and family

It’s OK for friends and family members to:

  • discuss how they will vote and their reasons for voting
  • give you their opinion about how they think you should vote
  • put your sealed postal ballot pack in a post box if you can’t do it yourself
  • help you get to the polling station
  • assist you in voting in certain circumstances (if you have a disability and with permission of staff in polling station; otherwise staff can provide assistance if needed). Any family or friends will need to sign a form stating they helped you to vote.

It’s not OK for friends and family members to:

  • force you to vote in a particular way or stop you from voting
  • take your postal ballot paper away from you, watch you complete it or ask to see it when you have completed it
  • cast your vote for you (pretending to be you), including marking your ballot paper for you or signing on your behalf or casting a vote for you just because you are away or incapacitated – even if they think they know how you would vote or you have said it would be OK.

If you want someone to vote on your behalf, you can apply to appoint a proxy.

Campaigners

It’s OK for campaigners to:

  • explain their party or candidate’s policies to you
  • encourage you to vote for their party or candidate
  • encourage you not to vote for another party or candidate
  • explain how the electoral registration or voting process works, including how to vote by post
  • provide you with an electoral registration form or an application form for a postal or proxy vote
  • give you advice about how to fill in an electoral registration form or an application form to apply for a postal or proxy vote.

It’s not OK for campaigners to:

  • force you to vote in a particular way or stop you from voting
  • offer to reward you for voting for them (for example, with money, food, gifts, a job or some treat)
  • watch you while you complete your postal ballot paper
  • take your postal ballot paper from you, especially if you have not voted and sealed the ballot paper in the official envelope
  • take your completed postal ballot pack away to deliver on your behalf, unless the Returning Officer has agreed that it would be OK for them to help you
  • get in the way or stop you from getting into the polling station to vote.

Was this page helpful?  Yes  No

Thank you for your feedback!

We're sorry about that. Why wasn't it helpful?
No response is given so please do not include contact information.

Weekly newsletter

Follow us