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Council Halls In South Ayrshire

Annbank Village Hall

Location: The site is centrally located to the west side of Annbank village, adjacent to Annbank Football Ground. Access to the site is via Weston Avenue, beyond the War Memorial to the west.

History and Development: The site comprises of two independent structures, the first of which dates from the 1950's and is a timber framed hut unit (clubroom). The hut provides a basic meeting room and makeshift store. The main hall provisions on the site were constructed in 1968. A single storey extension was added to the northwest elevation of the property in 1998 to provide addition storage provisions.

Accommodation: The property provides on one floor a main hall facility, raised stage area, dressing rooms, toilet provisions, kitchen and storage.

Ayr Town Hall

Location: The property is located centrally within the town of Ayr occupying a corner site fronting onto the High Street and New Bridge Street. There is private off street parking contained to the rear, accessed by a private lane, off New Bridge Street, that is controlled by automatic bollards. The site is located in the Ayr Central Conservation Area.

History and Development: The property comprises of two distinctive structures, firstly being the neo classical Town Hall property, which fronts onto New Bridge Street and returns along the High Street. The second part of the property comprises extended accommodation within the 19th century three storey residential and commercial properties, which adjoin the original Town Hall onto the High Street. The property is arranged on three varying levels, with differing external ground levels surrounding the site. The Town Hall building, extending from New Bridge Street to No. 11 High Street, is a category 'A' Listed Building of architectural and historical interest. The Property was constructed in 1827-32 by Thomas Hamilton and extended into High Street by James Sellars in 1878-81. The interior was partly reconstructed in 1901 by Kennedy Hunter following a fire.

Accommodation: The building is split over three storeys. There are council offices and the Magistrates Court and associated offices. The property has a first floor level Main Hall and balcony, with terraced seating permanently fixed overlooking a stage located at the east end of the Town Hall building. There are 4 meeting rooms.

Carvick Webster Hall

Location: This site is situated at Monkton Village Cross and is abutted on two sides by adjoining residential properties.

History and Development: The property was constructed in 1929 and is of a semi arts and crafts design. The hall was given to the village by Harry and Agnes Carvick Webster after their two sons died serving in World War I.

Loans Village Hall

Location: The site is centrally located to the east side of Loans village, occupying a corner site fronting onto Main Street and private unadopted road known as Hall Lane.

History and Development: The property was erected around 1940 and is of arts and craft design extending to one storey. The property was extended in 1977 to provide additional toilet facilities, storage and meeting room. Ramped disabled access to the main entrance was provided in 1998.

Accommodation: The property provides on one floor a main hall facility, raised stage area, cloak rooms, toilet provisions, kitchen and storage.

Loudoun Hall, Boat Vennal, Ayr

Location: This site is located in an urban residential/retail district in the New Bridge area of Ayr; access is via a public thoroughfare and service lane known as Boat Vennal. The property is situated within the Ayr Central Conservation Area.

History and Development: The building is a category 'A' Listed Building of architectural and historical interest. James Tait, a wealthy burgess of Ayr, constructed the property in 1513. The north wing of the property was constructed in 1934 and was subsequently restored in 1957. Loudoun Hall is rubble built with heavy slate roof and partially vaulted ground floor, with the stairs and windows copies of the 1534 original. The property also underwent further major restoration works affecting the complete stairwell area, first and second floors and external fabric, which were completed in 1997. Loudoun Hall leased to South Ayrshire Council by the Loudoun Hall Trustees.

McCosh Hall, Kirkmichael

Location: The site is located to the north of Kirkmichael village, fronting onto the Patna Road. A public bowling green adjoins the site and returns along the west gable and rear of the property to the north.

History and Development: The property is a red (Ballochmyle) sandstone property; constructed in 1899 extending to two floors with a long pitched cross collared slated roof, and rectangular clock tower on the northeast corner. Accommodation: The ground floor provides various meeting rooms, entrance hallway and stair access to the second floor, nursery space and toilet facilities. On the second floor is the main hall facility, storage rooms and stairwell providing access to both the ground and second floor of the clock tower.

Maybole Town Hall

Location: The property is located centrally within the town of Maybole, in the conservation area, occupying a corner site fronting onto the High Street (A77 main trunk road) and John Knox Street.

History and Development: The Tolbooth and Town Hall are a category 'B' Listed Building of architectural and historical interest. The earliest section of the property previously formed part of the old fortified courthouse and Tollbooth and dates from around 1700c. The original Tolbooth tower was subsequently affected by major restoration works around 1812, with the clock faces re-located within the roof fabric. The Town and Concert Hall structures were erected in 1887, in a Scottish Baronial manner, with tall traditional casement windows. The hall provisions were subsequently extended at the east of the property to provide caretakers' accommodation, which has now become part of the main hall facilities providing various meeting rooms.

Accomodation: The property is arranged to provide a main foyer and entrance, concert hall and stage, various cloaks and toilet provisions, kitchen, storage areas and meeting rooms on the ground floor. There are dressing room facilities at the first floor level, accessible from the stage area and flank corridor, chambers and lesser hall (committee room) and further kitchen storage provisions.

Montgomerie Hall, Dundonald

Location: The site is located at the south end of Dundonald village and within the village conservation area, fronting onto the Main Street.

History and Development: The original property was constructed around early 1800c and functioned as a school hall facility. There is also a single storey, slated pitched roof structure (originally providing kitchen provisions and outbuildings) which has been refurbished during 1995 to provide community workshop/craft facilities.

Accommodation: The property provides a main hall and stage, two small lesser halls, various cloaks and toilet provisions, kitchen, storage areas and craft workshop on the ground floor. There are dressing room facilities at the first floor level to the north end of the building, accessible from the stage area.

Richmond Hall, Kirkoswald

Location: The site is centrally located at the to the east side of Kirkoswald village, occupying a corner site fronting onto the Main Street (A77 trunk road) and Balvaird Road.

History and Development: The property was erected around 1925 and is of semi art and craft design, with a buff stone ashlar face and cruciform plan, extending to two storey, with a tall pitched slated roof, projecting front gable with clock face Richmond Hall was the subject of major refurbishment works in 1998. Accommodation: Richmond Hall provides on one floor a main hall facility, raised stage area, meeting rooms, toilet provisions, kitchen and storage.

Troon Town Hall and Walker Hall

Location: The property is located centrally within the town of Troon, in the existing conservation area, occupying a corner site fronting onto Academy Street and South Beach. The site has an open aspect across the Firth of Clyde.

History and Development: The property is arranged with the municipal offices to the front and Concert Hall to the rear and is a category 'B' Listed Building of architectural and historical interest. The Town and Concert Halls are of a neo Georgian design, constructed in 1932, with red hand-made brick and ashlar semi circular dressings in Blaxter sandstone to the ground floor openings. The 1973 Walker Hall extension is of cavity brick construction.

Accommodation: The municipal office is arranged to provide office and storage accommodation on four floors being the basement, ground, first and attic floor. The Concert Hall is arranged to provide facilities over three floors being the basement, ground and first, with the Concert Hall two storeys high. The Walker Hall secondary facilities such as toilet provisions, storage and kitchen etc are single storey. The hall, stage and projection room, dressing rooms and reception room occupying a two storey section of the building to the south of the site.

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Last updated: 25 February 2016

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