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Carer's assessment

Carers have a legal right to an assessment of their own needs. The purpose of an assessment is to provide carers with an opportunity to discuss what information or support they need. They can discuss their own health and aspects of their life, such as work and family, with a view to balancing these whilst maintaining their caring role. The information provided in the assessment is used to decide what information, advice or support they may require.

Although every situation is unique, the assessment will discuss some of the following areas:

  • the carers own views on their role as a carer
  • what care and support they’re providing
  • when they provide it
  • how often they’re providing it
  • their relationship to the person they care for
  • how being a carer might be affecting their health and wellbeing
  • how being a carer affects other aspects of their own life (family, work, socialising etc)
  • what might happen if they were no longer able to provide care
  • ways in which carers can be supported to enable them to continue caring
  • awareness of any carers’ benefits that might be available

The process of the assessment would involve the carer meeting with a member of our Community Care team and having a discussion around key areas such as those identified above. A carer’s assessment focuses on the carer, and not the person they support. Some carers may chose to decide that it should take place in private, away from the person they support.

If you would like to have a carer’s assessment, you should request this from the practitioner working with the person for whom you provide care. If the person you support has not had a community care assessment carried out and is not receiving any formal care services from the council, you can contact 0300 123 0900 and simply request that a carers assessment to be carried out.

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Last updated: 25 February 2016

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